Can Trying to Sell on Etsy Deminish the Love of Your Craft?


In my ever so humble opinion, the answer is overwhelmingly yes. At least at the moment.

I don’t think I am alone when I say that I check daily (okay, multiple time a day) the stats on my Etsy store, my Facebook Page and even the stats on my blog. Every day though, I am left wanting. Still no sales, still not enough followers – thus not enough people seeing my work – and as for the blog, that’s a whole other thing.

My blog, my happy place, is doing very well. I wouldn’t dream of changing my community here on WordPress – I don’t long (that much ;)) for numbers in the thousands. However, I received an email from a fellow blogger that suggested, in lieu of my 100th post (which will be here soon) to try to use it to get more people to follow me.

Your 100th post is a great time for a giveaway, and giveaways mean exposure! Make them work for it – make them follow you on Twitter, Tumblr, Facebook, Etsy, whatever. Make them be exposed to your stuff day in and day out- maybe then you’ll make some money! Good luck with that – just make sure what you are giving away doesn’t suck!

Wow. I know that the email was well intended but….wow. I have been happy just letting it smooth it’s way all by itself, the whole “build it and they will come” theory. Apparently, that is not how this works. More apparent is the fact that I don’t really like it.

I also don’t like knitting the things I have been knitting. In the hopes of making some money or getting more attention for my pages I have been working on things that are not on my priority list. I want to finish my shawl, I want my sock to find it’s sole mate ;). I want to try double knitting, learn to crochet, play with new knitting books and practice my spinning. Is there a way to do both? I see that there are some knitting stores that do very well and some that are just like mine, something akin to a frozen tundra. What is bothering me at the moment is the overwhelming feeling of failure – something my Panic Monster thrives on.

So what is a gal to do? Do I put aside the projects that I think will sell to focus on things that bring me happiness? Do I shut up and do what I need to do because it has been over two months that Trevor has been employed? Do I crawl into the fetal position and start eating my own hair? What? Seriously…what?

There has to be some happy medium, some place where I can remember how much I love knitting and still make things that people may want to purchase. I guess I am just still really new to this, usually when I knit it’s because a) the pattern demands it b) it would be perfect for…(fill in the blank) or c) this would be teaching me something new.

So maybe I will take the weekend and try to remember why I love knitting so much – do an internet blackout, or at least stay away from anything that is going to make me feel like such a damn failure.

So, friends and neighbors, what is a girl to do? ANY HELP WOULD BE MONUMENTALLY APPRECIATED!!

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94 thoughts on “Can Trying to Sell on Etsy Deminish the Love of Your Craft?

  1. Q

    Q – I agree with the advice your reader gave. Daughter Darcey runs her own successful online business theDealyo. She’s shared her advice with increasing a blog if it’s to be a business too. Periodic giveaways are an essential a part of her blog. Now Facebook has different “rules” if it’s to be used for business purposes. I know for her give-aways you have to follow the blog, like on Facebook and Twitter, etc. I never enter them because I’m family. LOL!

    Reply
  2. greatbigdragon

    I’m on Etsy and I haven’t sold anything in well over a year. My suggestion to you is that you put a lot of stuff in your store, And knit what you enjoy knitting, And then put that in your store. If you like it, other people should like it too. And then I hate to say it, because your work is worth a lot to yourself and the people who understand the value of handmade goods, but you have to try not to price it too high while at the same time not pricing it too low. That’s a big challenge. The giveaway is a neat idea, I should do that for my thousand post. Finally, don’t expect too much. The people who used to matter on Etsy have been jumping ship ever since they got bought out and the people who bought it out Changed the way that it works, in their opinion for the worse.

    Reply
      1. greatbigdragon

        Get a really nice carrot and a long, sturdy stick, a decent length of good string, and make them work for it. Give it a lot of exposure, have them join all your social network profiles, email and whatnot. For every four people that sign up for email stuff only 1 tends to unsubscribe. That means u can grow your exposure that way.

        Reply
  3. sourdoughkaty

    I think other people only love what you make when you yourself love making it. Others will SAY they like something you aren’t loving (“Oh, don’t frog it, it’s so pretty” or “it’s fine just the way it is”), but are they saying “I love it so much I want to spend as much money as all the handwork is worth on it now”?

    I don’t have an esty account, but my impression as a consumer is that many many people who shop on etsy are a bit crafty themselves. So they’re more likely to want the fantastic and unique, not the easy and quick to knit. Think of all the hunger games cowls that surfaced… So knit what you love and others will love it too.

    Reply
    1. shockabsorb3r

      i completely agree. if you love what you do it shows in the end product. even if its not the top-notch quality, people will go for it. then also a good trick…make stuff as gifts for close friends. they will love it and end up ordering from you to give away as a gift to another friend..and you end up your own pyramid scheme;D

      Reply
        1. shockabsorb3r

          hehehe…thanks:P

          but it worked with me. i drowned friends with earrings, they became my first ‘customers’ and also walking free commercial. everything counts in large amounts;D

          Reply
            1. shockabsorb3r

              take your time. locals are good place to start your base and get first regulars then expand further.
              and most important: enjoy it, don’t let it turn into a chore.

              Reply
  4. thecreativecortex

    This probably won’t help much, but I keep swinging by your Etsy store and gazing at your scarlet and grey beret, wanting to buy it, I just don’t have any spare money at the moment. But I think you should focus on knitting what you love. I was reading a blog post by knitwear designer Rohn Strong (http://rohnstrongdesigns.wordpress.com/page/2/) which you might find helpful. Don’t give up, businesses take a long time to get going, you just have to keep trying.

    Reply
        1. allnightknits Post author

          How is it regarded there, knitting I mean. Where I am there is one LYS, no fiber, no wheels….knitting regarded as a little old lady thing – I think that may be another problem. Why buy something handmade when you can go to a big box store and buy crap for a season or two.

          Reply
          1. thecreativecortex

            Yeah, it’s seen like an old lady thing over here too 😦 I’ve got two LYSs, although one hardly sells any wool now. The other is ok, but no spinning stuff. People in general do seem to prefer cheap crap clothing, but I think there will always be people who prefer something more individual and handmade.

            Reply
            1. allnightknits Post author

              If I were rich I think the last thing I would own is a closest full of designer clothes. I would be able to explore the world of things that people made with there own two hands – not something made is mass (no matter how expensive it is). There was a time when that was the only way to go – and things used to last forever!

              Oh God….I think I just turned 80 and didn’t realize it. Oh well, at least I got to skip my 30th birthday – which is still a year and a half away and I am dreading it 😉

              Reply
    1. suzetteg2013

      I get Rohns’ blog posts as well. I have done a KAL on his ravelry group and he is on my friends list on facebook. He is a very talented young designer. It is hard to make things work on facebook because they are constantly changing. They don’t help at all unless you pay them to and I share my page everyday and the numbers go up slowly. I am in no hurry but it would be nice if things could be different. I will soon be 66 and this is the first time I have tried to sell anything I have made. There have got to be others ways to do that other than etsy

      Reply
      1. allnightknits Post author

        I am looking at booths in craft fairs around the city, it just feels like “you need to be better” is constantly being screamed in my face.

        An overreaction sure, but at this point in my life knitting has saved me. We don’t have children (and not from a lack of trying), two sets of parents at least partially dependent on our income and my hubby has been out of work for two months.

        Maybe I just needed to vent, this community is a great place to do it! 😉

        Reply
  5. teabeaknits

    I joined Etsy because it acted like a marker in the sand for me trying to sell my craft – not to make money (I can’t knit that fast and can’t persuade hubby and sons to learn) but for fun. I agree with greatbigdragon that you knit what you like, make a beautiful job of it and then put it out there for people to admire if they choose so to do. I think you have to have to treat it as a bonus if anyone buys – and having looked at your site you have some pretty things on it. Perhaps you have to look at some of your tags? I sold a striped tea cosy as something for a sports fan in their team colours and I listed a load of teams that played in these colours – someone picked it up by the team name showing up in a search.

    Keep calm and carry on knitting!

    Reply
    1. allnightknits Post author

      Thank you! I don’t think it would bother me so much if poor hubby could find a job. We went and sealed someone’s driveway this morning just for a little cushion.
      The economy sucks, and Ohio is struggling. The last job he applied for they ended up hiring some with two Masters degrees. I just worry all the time… Just like everyone else.

      Reply
      1. teabeaknits

        It is a worry and I hope you find a way out of it soon – at least we have knitting as therapy, and you have each other. I don’t know how people who don’t have a hobby manage?

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  6. handmadebyterry

    Hiya Rachel! Okay, so people always have wonderful advice to share. Heck, we are sometimes even those ‘people’ lol. And the advice is often based on the ‘peoples’ positive experiences. But when you feel down about something you normally feel so passionate about and you are questioning yourself/your methods then I say it’s time to stopping thinking about what ‘people’ think and take a break to reconnect with yourself and your passions. So here is your homework for this weekend…take a spot of time to yourself in a different environment with sketchbook, notebook, pencils/pens, and headphones (Whether you turn them on or not is up to you, but if you are in a public location it will deter interruptions). Go to the place where you always feel the energy flow and let YOUR energy flow refocusing your inner self, identifying your dreams and goals and how you would like to accomplish them and then go home and create with your heart! Because you will need to once you have reconnected/refocused. Let’s just call it your personal reset button if you will! 🙂 😛 I’m single (I have a son but he’s 19 so yeah, lol), my family and childhood friends are a few states away, and my friends here all have different dynamics so being overwhelmed is something that requires regular maintenance to prevent for me and doing as I stated above always works to some degree. Oh and remember, we all do things differently that’s what makes this all so perfect. Just because the herd says something works for them doesn’t mean it’s going to work for you my unicorn friend! If you don’t like or aren’t comfortable with a marketing method don’t do it. You’ll just be miserable. Find what methods work for you and that you are comfortable with.

    Reply
    1. allnightknits Post author

      Wow, thank you so much. You have no idea how wonderful your homework assignment sounds like!
      Your kindness at sharing all this for me has made me nerdishly teary!

      Reply
  7. suzetteg2013

    You are definitely not a failure. I do not have an etsy store but have been thinking about it. My facebook knitting page, well that is another story all together. I have posted on there that I have paypal and will do commissions, but other than a few questions on pricing, I have sold nothing. I knit what I like and too bad if no one else likes it, although when I post everyone seems to like what I make, just not enough to buy it. Knit what you love to knit, if what you have on etsy is not selling, and you don’t really like making them. You have to love, and I mean REALLY LOVE what you are doing, or what is the point. Finish your lace shawl. I am waiting to see that and find the mate to the sock. I love your blogs and look forward to reading them. What is the name of your facebook page so I can go and like it as me and as my page..<3 :)..don't give up

    Reply
    1. allnightknits Post author

      Thank you! I’m All Night Knits on Facebook as well – but there is no pressure. I needed to vent, this community has always been so helpful and wonderful – I’m never disappointed sharing my thoughts here.
      Thank you so very, very much!

      Reply
  8. lisagono

    It’s really tough – we’ve all heard the career advice to do what you love, but trying to turn a passion into a business can certainly suck the joy out of it. Unfortunately, I think that any internet based business (my husband does wedding/portait photography on the side) involves a LOT of hustle to get clients, in fact, I think most people spend at least as much time drumming up business as they do actually knitting, crocheting, writing, taking photos, teaching yoga, sewing etc. Best of luck – and I agree, try to enjoy yourself this weekend!

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  9. Hannah Rose

    I could have written this post myself, and have lamented the same problems so many times before. I have read every thing available about how to make your Etsy shop a success, improve sales, and make life awesome. The last week or so I’ve been in a creative slump because of this. It’s just like…..I love what I do, I love making things, but sometimes I get this depressive mood where I want to give up on the idea of doing what I love for a living, because it’s not even worth the work, pain, strife, frustration, and constant disappointment. I get physically drained and just want to give up and take a nap. It’s awful.

    I just got a free book on my Kindle called The Social Media Starter Kit that’s supposed to tell you how to use all the various internet sites to your advantage to grow your business, but so far I’m just like…I ALREADY do those things and I get NADA. I’ve downloaded so many articles and help manuals, and I’m so sick of them.

    ANYWAY, I realize I’m probably not helping any, so I’ll try something positive.
    I’ve heard a lot of people say that you have to move OUTSIDE of online sales, and especially Etsy, in order to truly succeed. Craft fairs and shows, arts and crafts festivals, anything like that. You have to go out and basically pimp your work in as many venues as possible. Word of mouth, both on and off line, are a huge key. Blogging is a great way to network and meet people who are in the same boat as you, but apparently, it’s not good to find buyers because of that reason. We can help each other, buy from each other, but since we’re in the same community of SELLING, we’re not BUYING, so we’re not customers.

    Many “professionals” suggest having your own website, where people can purchase directly from you. I’m not sure how you’re supposed to ensure you get traffic and thus sales. Most people say paying for ads, like on Facebook, has been pretty useless.

    I’m still reading and doing research, muddling through useless info I don’t need, or something I’ve been told or read about a hundred times already. I’ve learned some stuff, but it’s mostly been by trial and error.

    Reply
    1. allnightknits Post author

      I feel your pain, but the idea of pimping myself has popped into my mind here and again. Mainly it is a fear that I am a Sh!$$y knitter and don’t know it (I’m not fishing for compliments, just working it out in my mind).
      Trial and error, life seems full of that right now huh?

      Reply
  10. Hannah Rose

    Oh, and I think making what YOU want to make, what you LOVE to make, goes over better than making something you think will sell, just for that reason. I think everyone makes better creations when it’s something they love.

    Reply
  11. Valerie Baber Designs

    I found on Etsy you really need to do the promote with their search Ads. I wasn’t getting many sales until last fall when I tried this out. It costs money, but really helps you get more notice. I don’t do it in the summer as that is not a high time for my scarves and the lot. You really have to promote and treasury’s really help get you noticed by other Etsy stores which also pass on the word about who you are and what you have. It is hard work keeping up with all the techno stuff you have to do and I find it overwhelming sometimes and have to pull away so I can get back to enjoying what I do. It is easy to get sucked in to the computer instead of what we love. Also being on Etsy teams really helps. You can post your new items and treasuries too. It all helps. But I have to say it made a huge difference when I did the search Ads. Hope this helps. It takes time. You will sell, don’t let it bring you down. I love what you make, all those hats were fantastic!! It just take some time. 🙂

    Reply
    1. allnightknits Post author

      Yeah but your work is amazing, I was literally just ogling your store! You bring something new to the table- that sets you apart.
      Thank you for the advice, from you I’d take it anytime!

      Reply
      1. Valerie Baber Designs

        Thanks you are tooooo kind. I have been doing this for a long time. I took 7 years off and didn’t even knit a stitch. Hated knitting for a while, and now that I am back I am loving it. I can’t stop. It will come, you should work on what you love. That will sell as people will see the love! And want to buy it for themselves. Seriously! You have to enjoy what you do as it will come out in your work! So enjoy and do what you want, your the boss of it!! 🙂 Most of all Love it!

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  12. Jennifer

    You’ve probably gotten a million comments like this. Here’s one more :). I tried Etsy too, twice or three times. I sold rarely. I knew I would never make a living off of it. I am a published quilter – and I have hundreds of pieces of my work in private collections and one on permanent exhibition. Nothing I tried on Etsy worked. I owed them more than I made. Whenever I try to earn money from my sewing, quilting, knitting, dying, etc., AND I pervert it to appeal to the masses – I hate it. I don’t want to do it and I don’t like doing it. So my advice is do what you want. If you need cash quick, don’t focus on the lack, write down what you’re grateful for – and look at it a lot. And then do what you love ——-

    Reply
      1. Jennifer

        I know. I’ve been hitting my head against a brick wall trying to figure out how to do that for years. A little bit here and there doesn’t help a lot. Nobody’s buying much – I think we’re all in the same boat.

        Reply
        1. allnightknits Post author

          I think patterns are the way to make money – just look at Tiny Owl Knits. If she had only made the Beekeeper’s Quilt pattern she would be swimming in a second income.

          I should know, I think I have bought almost all her patterns 🙂

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  13. salpal1

    Since you ask, here is what I think.It is HARD (almost impossible) to make a living on knitting – I mean think about it – how much do you want to get paid an hour? Minimum wage? Plus materials, plus overhead (lights? Yarn storage space? 🙂 ) So you are putting a ridiculous amount of pressure on yourself. What IS possible to do over time is to build a following of happy customers, and above are lots of ways to do that. The advice to knit what you love is very good, because you want to be able to keep doing this long term, and if you hate it, you won’t want to. I truly think the real way to make money is to work on your skills enough that you can design. You make one pattern and keep making it and selling the pattern as well as the finished garment, even kits, and it keeps earning you money. But first you have to practice enough to be able to design patterns people want to buy. And I think you can do that. And while you are practicing and trying things, keep building your followers on all fronts. I have looked at your store, and like some of your things, in fact have a note to myself that when I have some extra money, to go shopping there, so don’t lose hope, right now you just have poor followers!

    Reply
  14. lottieknits

    Don’t get me started on this sort of thing! I’ve never sold on Esty, but I did used to sell a craft/school fairs before I got my job (long story, but I got Glandular Fever, had to leave my Uni course as I was too ill to continue and was later diagnosed with M.E./Chronic Fatigue Syndrome which I still have, but I’m improving). At the time it was all I could do as my health was still too variable to do a job and be reliable.

    So, stuff I learnt (I sold mainly hand made jewellery and some knits):
    1) Summer is a rubbish time for sales. Don’t be disheartened it’s the same for everyone, even shops and Internet stores.
    2) Sell what you love! You’ll be naturally more enthusiastic and that will shine through and inspire the same enthusiam in your customers.
    3) Chat to you customers at fairs, be engaging. They’re more likely to buy and you might learn something about new things you could make or improve on (but don’t make hasty decisions based on just one comment from the local oddball ‘make dolls clothes, I collect them!’ is not statistically relevant!
    4) Book Christmas fairs – people are in the mood to buy!
    5) Always have a few smaller lower priced items for impulse purchases, especially at fairs where there will be kids 🙂
    6) The only way to learn is to just have a go. Don’t give up, it won’t happen overnight!
    I’m sure there’s more but that’s all I can think of right now. If I think of anything else I’ll let you know :D. xxx

    Reply
    1. allnightknits Post author

      I am so sorry that you were ill – although it does my heart good to know you are on the mend!

      You have some of the best advice I have gotten thus far – all the advice has been wonderful but as always the way you present it makes me feel warm and fuzzy 😉

      This weekend I did nothing but what I wanted to do and I feel SO MUCH BETTER. There is more news on the horizon – but for now I am just thrilled to have finished the shawl!

      Reply
      1. lottieknits

        So glad you’ve finished your shawl 😀 sometimes you just need to take break when it is all getting you down.

        It’s a long time now since I got ill (May 2006), but I still have to be careful not to overdo it – not always an easy thing to do when you are the sort of person who hates being idle (I’m a perfectionist and I tend to push myself and get anxious when I don’t think I am doing as much or as well as I think I should) – but not wanting to be idle is what made me want to learn to knit 6 months after I first got ill. I really enjoyed it, and 3 years later I was working in a yarn shop, so it all worked out in the end.

        It was hard to take at the time as my health meant that I had no choice but to leave Uni, but in the end I think I am happier doing what I do now, so I’ve been very lucky really.

        Reply
        1. allnightknits Post author

          I am sure the positive attitude does nothing but positive things for your health. Honestly, I think I would rather work in a yarn shop than have some fancy degrees that aren’t really doing me any good in this economy.

          Reply
  15. iknitiatives

    One thing I can suggest is to try to build as much community as you can within your craft. I’m a newer indie dyer and spinner but have been knitting and crocheting for years. I also have my own Etsy shop and feel that in the beginning as I’m finding out, I need a good bit of self-promotion. So therefore, I use my blog and Instagram to post shop updates. Also, I listen to a ton of knitting podcasts and most recently donated one of my hand-dyed braids as a prize on this video podcast that I follow. I hope to do that more but that is a great way to get your name and products out there. Don’t be afraid to at first give away or donate your products if it helps to bring you or your shop some advertisement in exchange. Good luck, I’m there with you!

    Reply
    1. allnightknits Post author

      It is not what I expected, that’s for sure. You’re right though – word of mouth and loads of research is the way to go. What podcasts are you listening to?

      Reply
      1. iknitiatives

        I listen to the following: Knitmore girls, Craftstash, Yarngasm, retro lemon, we are yarn, knit me happy, geeky girls knit, must stash, sassypants knitter, knitting go, positively knitting, yarniacs, Sockbunny, the dyers notebook, single-handed knits, fiberista files, knitting blooms, yarn cast, ready set knit, and knitpicks.

        Reply
  16. Glenda

    I used to love photography until I made or my business. If you don’t feel comfortable advertising like that, don’t do it. It won’t get any better.

    Reply
  17. knitnrun4sanity

    wow.You have had so much advice that I am not sure I can add much more. I have never done giveaways as I have always wanted people to follow me because they like what they see. I have found that it all grows organiclly. It is slow but gradual. I have really thrown myself into blogs. I always comment on what I read and try to find new blogs through my reader. Do you share posts on twitter and facebook? Also you need to take into account followers that are not through wordpress etc. Finally, have you thought about joining in with a ‘party’ such as handmade monday? Goodluck with whatever you decide. Do keep enjoying. xx

    Reply
    1. allnightknits Post author

      It is always good to hear your perspective. I think I want to do a giveaway without any hoops to jump through – just share something within the community to say thanks for being awesome. If people want to start following one of the many (MANY) social media sites associated then great! If not – so skin off my…bum 😉

      Reply
  18. daniellajoe

    Nothing comes easy, I have no experience selling on etsy but I believe it takes effort and exposure to be a successful artisan, that’s my 2 cents. 🙂

    Reply
    1. allnightknits Post author

      Thank you for your 2 cents – it is always warmly welcomed. I am trying to reconfigure this whole thing – how to get exposure and how to go about selling. I have a few ideas and hopefully I can just make those ideas better.

      Reply
  19. Winter Owls

    Rachel, I’m not a big seller on Etsy and I’m still learning about it but I’ve got a few ideas for you to try. 1. Join an Etsy Team (find them in community). I’m in a few teams and we make team treasuries which then often get on the Australian Home Page. This can really lift the amount of people that visit your shop. 2. Make what you love and fill up the next page of your shop. 3. It took me months to make my first sale, so don’t get dispirited 🙂

    Reply
    1. allnightknits Post author

      Thank you so much! I have gotten so much great advice, I cannot wait to jump in!

      I am a little confused about how the treasuries work though, which is pretty sad considering I should be able to use the site I am selling on 😉 It’s on my list of things to do this week.

      Reply
  20. cross(stitch)yourheart

    I’ve never used etsy but I’ve thought about it. In the end it seemed like a lot of work for something that wouldn’t end up p making much money. Do you have any small stores around that sell local? You could advertise your etsy store with cards that come with purchase.

    But good luck with everything. It takes time but eventually you’ll get an opportunity. Things really well work out. I have a hard time believing that for myself so I know saying and doing are different things, but it will

    Reply
    1. allnightknits Post author

      That is so kind, thank you so much.

      I think that this wouldn’t bother me if poor Trevor hadn’t gotten laid off. When his company was sold it was like a punch in the stomach. We have two sets of parents and ourselves depending on our incomes – I think more than anything I am just scared.

      Selling as always been a fun dream – although I prefer to give things as gifts, mood-lifters and surprises. But with the pressure of money woes I’ve let it get the better of me.

      This weekend helped, and your words have helped so much. Everyones really have:)

      Reply
  21. Pat(ricia)

    After reading all responses, I can’t help but agree.

    First of all: KNIT WHAT YOU LOVE … do it very well … to the best of your abilities and LOVE IT.
    Stop trying to please other people …. it’ll never work.

    As for the crafting as a primary income: as so many people said …. it’s BEYOND difficult …. BUT don’t give up or give in.
    Many here have offered some really excellent suggestions … the only thing I could add is this: maybe focus on 3 types of items that you love to knit and knit them every which way … then take your work to craft sales and fairs etc. Start locally and get yourself out there. Try to have items that are spectrum priced … from cheaper end to modest and then have a few “pricer” items. In order to profit from what you do … you need to sell yourself.
    As for etsy … can’t say anything about it …. have never been … but think about it …. you’re trying to sell off-season and mostly, as someone mentioned, to OTHER crafters. It seems to me you need to think outside of the “cyber space box” and do some leg work.

    I would also suggest that you set aside specific time for “commercial knitting” (what you hope to sell) and “personal knitting.” Both are equally important … especially if you want to earn $$$ doing this …. you just need to stick to the plan … and hold yourself to it. Being self-employed … in ANY field … is a 24/7/365 affair … and it’s hard …. which is why you need to do what you love, love what you do and ensure you make time for yourself and personal interests.

    Good luck and keep the faith and stitches on the needles. 🙂

    Reply
  22. perniciouspurls

    Wow. You are going through exactly what I’m feeling! I would love to get my etsy store up and running. Sell my knits so that people will love them just as much as me. But everytime I get ready to start I find something else to make for someone, something new I want to try. Put that together with the fact that i still haven’t got a grip on bloggin yet… it’s hard!

    What i’ve been told a few times is this:
    What you’ve got to do is way up the options,
    Are you wanting the store to be your main sorce of income? If so, then you’re going to need to do alot to try and get your name out there to show the world why they need your product over anyone else’s.
    If you’re wanting it just to help get rid of the mounds of knitting that build up in your home, then perhpas a little advertising on facebook and your blog are all you need to do.

    I will agree with the people above though. Knit what you love. If you put that much love into an item, it’s going to be hard for people who have followed you and read the descriptions not to fall in love also!

    Reply
    1. allnightknits Post author

      Thank you, that is so kind! I cannot how believe how awesome the community here is – it has made everything I was worried about seem like nothing!

      Hey – what’s your stores name?

      Reply
      1. Anonymous

        The store is PerniciousPurls (same as my blog). I haven’t quite got it up and running yet though 😦 Everytime I think I have something to sell, it get’s given to a friend.
        *fingers crossed* I’ll get it up soon

        Reply
      2. Anonymous

        My store is PerniciousPurls (just like my blog) But I havent gotten it up and running yet. 😦 Each time I knit something and am ready to sell, I end up giving it to a friend. Oh well, *fingers crossed* I can get it up soon.

        Reply
  23. Giggletree

    I’m also a compulsive stats checker on Etsy. Put more stuff up, they say. I put lots more stuff up and nada, nothing, bubkes. I’m getting more love, but sales? Not so much. I’ve noticed that most etsy buyers are makers themselves, so patterns and supplies seem to do well. But still, it’s a great way to sell and as long as you’re not financially stressed, and if it’s not up there it’s never going to sell.

    Reply
    1. allnightknits Post author

      It’s a good way to look at it – but we are a little financially stressed (they sold my husbands company two months ago and still no job). I think that is what exacerbates it.

      Reply

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